#11 A Note on...Fast Fashion

Tuesday, 19 February 2019


Okay, let's talk about fast fashion. Fast fashion is where inexpensive clothing is produced rapidly by mass-market retailers in response to the latest trends.
When I was in high school, Superdry was the biggest brand that you had to have. I (fortunately) never got on this trend. But my school was flooded with kids running around in their pink and black or orange and black, waterproof, Superdry coats. Another big trend in high school was Cath Kidston bags and yes, I was in on this trend. For all the lucky ex-high school kids who don't know what Cath Kidston is, let me explain. There was a take-over of bags from this shop in my school. These bags were oil clothed and made to last forever. However, as the Superdry and Cath Kidston trends died down, fewer and fewer people bought their coats and bags to school. Now, what I find funny about this is that these products were not cheap and were definitely meant to last. And although I am definitely didn't jump on the waterproof, Superdry coat bandwagon, I was guilty of hoarding Cath Kidston bags in the back of my wardrobe until I recently donated them. And this is a classic example of fast fashion.

I would love to say that fast fashion affects children more than adults, but in reality, I don't think it does. Yes, if children go to school and see everybody wearing a Superdry coat, they are going to want one too and eventually when people stop wearing them, they will stop too. But I think adults are just as inclined to go into shops like H&M or Primark and browse the sale rack. I think fast fashion is marketed more towards adults. For instance, every advert for clothing on Tv is for aimed at adults, even the clothes for children is marketed towards parents as the clothing is described as being 'durable and easy to wash', which I can almost guarantee, the children will not care about. 


So, there are a few reasons how fast fashion is impacting our environment. First of all, textile dyeing is the second largest polluter of clean water globally, after agriculture. The amount of energy and dye it takes to colour clothes is crazy and with clothes going and out of trend as fast as they do, it creates an even bigger carbon footprint. Secondly, any waste we create as humans is not great. So many clothes start at full price in the store, then go to the sale rack for really cheap and are then just thrown away when not sold. In reality, chains should be donating clothes or putting non-sold items to better use. Thirdly, most popular clothing stores use polyester in their fabrics as it's cheap and durable. However, when you wash polyester garments they shed microfibres that add to the increasing levels of plastic in the ocean. Microfibres are really small and can easily pass through water and sewage, making their way straight to the sea. Which is exactly what humanity should be trying to avoid.


How can we do to combat fast fashion? It's simple really, donate, reuse, resell and try to avoid bigger retailers. Of course, I am not saying boycott shops like Zara, TopShop and H&M forever, but after you have used and loved some clothing, donate it. Don't bin it. If you have a whole in a loved jumper, don't throw it away, sew it back up. Also, shop more in charity shops. The amount of bargains I have found in my local thrift shops is crazy and to think that I could have paid full price for a less environmentally friendly version in a high-street shop is ludicrous. 

Reduce, reuse and recycle is important - even when it comes to clothes. 
Thank you for reading this post. 






Join the conversation!

  1. I really really loved this post and I'm not just saying that. I'm also consistently concerned about how mass production of things we use in our daily lives affects our environment and how we can make conscious efforts to make beeter decisions. Cultural industriez are hazardous to humanity in many ways and fast fashion as put by you definitely is one. Thank you for writing a quick awareness post. ��

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    1. Thank you my dear! Yes, fast fashion is something that needs to be spoken about more x

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  2. Such an important post

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  3. Great tips. We don't really have Cath Kidston in Canada, but I certainly remember similar things from my school days!

    www.poutineandprada.com

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  4. I don't really get fast fashion. I never was into the trends. My mom just bought us clothes at Sears and we were happy. But, that coat is wonderful, I love those coats when I lived in North Dakota during the blizzard months!

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    1. hahaahah Thank you, my coat is actually from a charity shop. I try my best to shop at charity and second hand shops! Thanks for your comment x

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  5. Ooo I like this post also I’m no stranger to charity shops they are amazing x

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  6. Never knew Fast fashion was a thing! This post was an eye opener! Thanks for sharing!

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  7. Yes! I wish people wouldn't judge so harshly for shopping second-hand.

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  8. Really great important post, a well researched insight that I agree with x

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  9. 1000% this!!! Fast fashion has lots to answer for. I understand that money is tight for so many of us but often buying good quality and/or buying organic will last the test of time so the money put into it is so worth it. I try to make all of my clothing in organic fabric for the reasons that you've brilliantly pointed out.
    Great read :)

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  10. This was a really interesting read as I've heard a lot of people talking about fast fashion recently but didn't know much about it! I'm forever donating my old clothes to a charity shop, I don't know why people would just throw them away unless they're not good quality anymore!

    Jess // foundationsandfairytales.wordpress.com
    xx

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  11. This was such a great read, its really made me think about where I'm shopping and whats coming from my clothes. I've been the kind of person to keep what I own until they've lived a long life, but I'm going to start making more of an effort to shop in different places now!

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  12. Very interesting to read and you made some great points! I laughed at the mention of Superdry and Cath Kidston as they definitely were a huge part of what was considered ‘in’ whilst I was at school! I never had the famous Superdry coat but I did also have a Cath Kidston bag!x

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  13. Such a great post. When it comes to fashion, yes I always go for second chances. Reuse, recycle is what every woman love to do with her clothes.

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  14. Really enjoyed reading this post!! I still see lots of SuperDry around but the people wearing them are all a bit older!

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  15. This is such an important topic! I've always been one to donate old clothes and search my favourite charity shops for vintage finds. X

    https://www.femaleoriginal.com

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  16. This is a great post! My mother and I were only talking about fast fashion yesterday (I think there was a piece in the news in which someone was proposing a 1p charge for every fast fashion item a retailer produces). We do most of our shopping at charity shops now, I just hate seeing things go to waste, and I love the amazing items you can pick up in charity shops too xxx

    Ashley
    https://lellalee.com

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    1. Thank you Ashley, I feel exactly the same way. I always donate clothes and buy from charity shops x

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  17. Thankfully this is being spoken Bout more now. I buy lots of second hand dresses and get far more compliments for being unique rather than following a trend.

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    1. Thank you Jo! Being unique is definitely the way forward x

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  18. This was such a great and insightful post!

    Jessica & James | www.foodandbaker.co.uk

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